Friday, October 29, 2004

Bill O’Reilly..." to her about phone sex, vibrators, threesomes, masturbation, the loss of his virginity, and sexual fantasies. " has in a slippery spineless sort of way endorsed Bush, though previously he said he wouldn't. Bill must have a strong stomach, personally I'd puke if I spinned as much as he does.

Thursday, October 28, 2004

John Kerry - Superhero:
Here's the deal - what's been missing from the entire Kerry campaign is just how tough a motherfucker John Kerry really, actually is, and it's got jackshit to do with hunting geese and killing the Vietcong. Kerry is a superhero, the kind of valiant son of a bitch who doesn't give a rat's ass about his own life in order to make the lives of others better. It's his post-Vietnam life that makes him a superhero. You don't know how much a superhero the man in the cape is by his origins. You know a superhero by his deeds. And if Kerry loses, it'll be because his campaign refused to acknowledge just how kick-ass Kerry has been since his final purple heart (and if Kerry loses, adviser Bob Shrum, who, in essence, said the public was too stupid to understand Kerry's accomplishments, should be strung up by his balls and batted around like a pinata by the Democratic party leadership until he bursts open and showers everyone with his innards).

Rude Pundit is going to ruin his reputation, if I'm any indication this is one of those heart felt rants that may make some a little misty eyed.

U.S. general: Bin Laden still issuing orders
3 years after 9/11, al-Qaida senior leadership believed in charge
BAGRAM, Afghanistan - Three years after the Sept. 11 attacks, Osama bin Laden and his deputy are still issuing orders for attacks by al-Qaida, a top American commander told The Associated Press Saturday.

Maj. Gen. Eric Olson said that an al-Qaida linked group was suspected of a deadly car bombing at a U.S. security firm in the Afghan capital last month. He said the attack was a suicide mission.

"There are senior leaders of al-Qaida that are working through operatives in Afghanistan," Olson told The Associated Press in an interview. "They are involved in planning and in some cases directing attacks inside of Afghanistan."

Story dated Sept. 11, 2004, but he is disturbing that with Bush recently requesting another 70 billion for both Iraq and Afghanistan, that Afghanistan is still a center of al-Qaida activity. How can we believe these guys when they say they didn't let bin Laden slip away at Tora Bora.

Wednesday, October 27, 2004

Interesting article on the threat of conventional weapons in Iraq

Tip of the iceberg
However disturbing this story, what the New York Times and CBS News have overlooked so far is that the missing munitions at Al Qaqaa are only the tip of the iceberg and in all likelihood represent a mere fraction of the illicit explosive material currently circulating in Iraq. Having personally toured weapons caches comparable in scale to Al Qaqaa and seen similar ordnance in the process of being converted into roadside bombs at an insurgent hideout, I believe that the theft and redistribution of conventional explosives and weapons represent the largest long-term threat to American troops in Iraq. Strangely enough, it is likely that dealing with this conventional weapons threat, rather than eradicating the mythical unconventional WMD threat, will be the U.S. legacy in Iraq.

and this is a small testament to what an egomanical asshat Saddam was:
There were scores of 6,000-pound anti-ship bombs of Chinese manufacture, for which the Iraqis never possessed aircraft capable of lifting.

Tuesday, October 26, 2004

Spy World. via JustinLogan.com has a piece from the print edition of American Conservative.
The undeclared warfare between the CIA and the Bush administration has continued despite the arrival of Porter goss as Director of Central Intelligence. On Sept. 28, at the Vice President's request, the Agency provided a special briefing on the subject of Jordanian terrorist Mu'sab al-Zarqawi. The CIA's Counter Terrorism Center (CTC) reviewed all of the available intelligence on the subject and based its briefing on a just completed comprehensive intelligence analysis. The CTC concluded that Saddam Hussein had not materially supported Zarqawi before the U.S.-led invasion and that Zarqawi's infrastructure in Iraw before the war was confined to the northern no-fly zones of Kurdistan, beyond Baghdad's reach. Cheney reacted with fury, screaming at the briefer that CIA was trying to get John Kerry elected by contradicting the president's stance that Saddam had supported terrorism and therefore needed to be overthrown. The hapless briefer was shaken by the vice president's outburst, and the incident was reported back to Goss, who indicated that he was reluctant to confront the vice president's staff regarding it.

Cheney, not a memebr of the reality based community is frustrated that reality and people with a backbone will not bend to his will.

Monday, October 25, 2004

John Kerry was right: U.S. Concludes Bin Laden Escaped at Tora Bora Fight
The Bush administration has concluded that Osama bin Laden was present during the battle for Tora Bora late last year and that failure to commit U.S. ground troops to hunt him was its gravest error in the war against al Qaeda, according to civilian and military officials with first-hand knowledge.

Intelligence officials have assembled what they believe to be decisive evidence, from contemporary and subsequent interrogations and intercepted communications, that bin Laden began the battle of Tora Bora inside the cave complex along Afghanistan's mountainous eastern border. Though there remains a remote chance that he died there, the intelligence community is persuaded that bin Laden slipped away in the first 10 days of December.

Iraq veterans open up on mishandling of war
Jennifer Giese of the 826th Ordinance experienced this firsthand; she came home and found orders to report to Ohio's Fort Campbell. After spending 68 days on base due to confusion over troop deployment, she was sent to Tikrit and stationed at an abandoned Iraqi airbase.

While the unit suffered no fatalities in Iraq, they were plagued the entire time by supply chain glitches. The unit never received body armor, and had to resort to stealing scrap metal for vehicle armor. Bottled water had to be rationed due to shortages, but Giese later filled a swimming pool for a general's use.

"This was a complete, chaotic mess," Giese said. "In my opinion there was no plan ... no one knew where we were going."

The more things change the more it seems like we're back in the Gilded Age of corruption, bent principles, and cronyism.

After Terror, a Secret Rewriting of Military Law
But three years later, not a single terrorist has been prosecuted. Of the roughly 560 men being held at the United States naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, only 4 have been formally charged. Preliminary hearings for those suspects brought such a barrage of procedural challenges and public criticism that verdicts could still be months away. And since a Supreme Court decision in June that gave the detainees the right to challenge their imprisonment in federal court, the Pentagon has stepped up efforts to send home hundreds of men whom it once branded as dangerous terrorists.

I like puppies and I get a little misty eyed at the end of "Brian's Song", but I'm far from a bleeding heart when it comes to imprisoning the likes of people that killed Daniel Pearl , but it seems that that is the BushCo's real weakness. There's lots of boots on the ground, lots of childish swagger, and lots of promises, but very little real progress in getting at the roots of world wide terror. Civilians are paying the biggest price for Bush's missteps, not terrorists. In that sense is it any wonder that the world sees Bush's actions as being as bad as Bin Ladens. Osama kills innocent people, so does Bush. That's not shrill hyperbole, that's the truth.

After Terror, a Secret Rewriting of Military Law
But three years later, not a single terrorist has been prosecuted. Of the roughly 560 men being held at the United States naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, only 4 have been formally charged. Preliminary hearings for those suspects brought such a barrage of procedural challenges and public criticism that verdicts could still be months away. And since a Supreme Court decision in June that gave the detainees the right to challenge their imprisonment in federal court, the Pentagon has stepped up efforts to send home hundreds of men whom it once branded as dangerous terrorists.

I like puppies and I get a little misty eyed at the end of "Brian's Song", but I'm far from a bleeding heart when it comes to imprisoning the likes of people that killed Daniel Pearl , but it seems that that is the BushCo's real weakness. There's lots of boots on the ground, lots of childish swagger, and lots of promises, but very little real progress in getting at the roots of world wide terror. Civilians are paying the biggest price for Bush's missteps, not terrorists. In that sense is it any wonder that the world sees Bush's actions as being as bad as Bin Ladens. Osama kills innocent people, so does Bush. That's not shrill hyperbole, that's the truth.